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Belle Meade Plantation  In 1807, Virginian John Harding bought Dunham's Station log cabin and 250 acres on the Natchez Trace. For the next 100 years, the Harding family prospered, building their domain into a 5,400 acre plantation that was world renowned as a thoroughbred horse farm. Nashville
Belmont Mansion Today the gilt frame mirrors hanging over original marble mantels, still reflect the elaborate gasoliers and elegantly furnished parlors. The Grand Salon is considered by architectural historians to be the most elaborate domestic interior built in antebellum Tennessee. The gardens, now maintained as part of the college campus, contain marble statuary and the largest collection of 19th century cast iron garden ornaments in the United States, including five cast iron gazebos. Nashville

Carl Van Vechten Gallery at Fisk University  Charted in 1867, Fisk University had a year earlier been known as the Fisk School, a free school for African-Americans in Nashville. Among the many campus buildings is one of only five National Historic Landmarks in Nashville, Jubilee Hall, built in 1876 with funds raised by the Jubilee Singers. The Carl Van Vechten Art Gallery is located in the former gymnasium and mechanical arts building, built in 1888. Nashville
The Carter House  This Registered Historic Landmark is now open to the public and serves as a memorial to the Carter Family as well as the countless heroes in the Battle of Franklin. The modest brick home was the Federal Command Post while the family took refuge in the basement. See the evidence of over 1,000 bullet holes remaining on site, including the most battle-damaged building from the Civil War. Franklin

Fort Nashborough  On January 1, 1780, Nashville was founded when James Robertson led his group of pioneers across the frozen Cumberland river to a place called The Cedar Bluffs. It was here that these men built a fort called Nashborough which would be shelter for the first families until Indian attacks ended in 1792. Nashville
Fox Trot Carousel  Take a spin through Tennessee history on the Fox Trot Carousel. This remarkable work of art, created by Nashville native Red Grooms, is the subject of the NPT documentary Carousel of Time.  The carousel started spinning in Nashville's Riverfront Park in November of 1998. Instead of ordinary merry-go-round characters, this popular attraction features 36 figures from Tennessee history. Nashville
The Hermitage  As the nation struggled for identity in the early 1800s, Jackson symbolized the transition from untamed wilderness to international power. So does Jackson's home, The Hermitage, convey his evolution from penniless orphan to national leader. Nashville
Historic Carnton Plantation  Not only was Historic Carnton Plantation a field hospital during the Battle of Franklin, but it was also a profitable, large-scale farming operation established in 1826 by Randal McGavock, a former mayor of Nashville. The plantation was the home to several generations of the McGavock family and the African-American families who lived as slaves on the property. Franklin
Historic Cragfont House  A visit to Cragfont is a step into the past combining cultural and architectural history. Started in 1798 and completed in 1802 by General James Winchester, Cragfont was the finest mansion house on the Tennessee frontier. The formal parlor, pictured above, features the original wall stenciling and stippled woodwork. Memphis
Historic Falcon Manor  In 1896, entrepreneur Clay Faulkner told his wife Mary he'd build her "the finest mansion in the region" if she would move next to their woolen mill, 2-1/2 miles from downtown McMinnville. Faulkner's solid-brick, 10,000-square-foot mansion had all the "modern conveniences" when it was built -- electric lights, indoor plumbing, central heat, and more. McMinnville
Historic Mansker's Station is a staffed living history site which is maintained by the City of Goodlettsville, Tennessee. The site represents the Station built by Kasper Mansker in the late 18th Century. Reproduced very near the original site, Mansker's Station is approximately one-third the size of the original lacking only the full number of individual cabins which would have been in the original station. Goodlettsville
Historic Rugby, Tennessee - Victorian England in the Tennessee Cumberlands Historical Rugby, Tennessee  British-founded Rugby, Tennessee, is a rare example of a rural, living community that survives from its 1880s utopian beginnings with its town plan intact, many buildings and its natural setting preserved and with no encroaching incompatible development.  This is the result of a long chain of human effort to preserve it, inspired by its founder's vision of equality and cooperation, community planning and natural resources stewardship. Rugby
Jack Daniels Distillery  Whenever you're in the vicinity of Lynchburg, just over an hour's drive from Nashville, we sure hope you can drop by for a firsthand look at our distillery.  One of our guides will accompany you on a tour and tell you the complete story of our whiskey.  You'll discover why, since day one, it's never been subject to change.
Lynchburg
Mallory-Neely House  The Mallory-Neely House, built in 1852 by Isaac Kirtland, plays an important role in Memphis history. Nestled in the heart of the Victorian Village, the Mallory-Neely House today is a living museum that tells the story of how Memphians lived during the 1800s. Memphis
The Netherland Inn  The stately historic Netherland Inn rises high above the Holston River.  From the 1760s travelers came by wagon down the Island Road to the river bank where they built boats and migrated west.  The restored Netherland Inn and section of the Old Boatyard depict an intimate study of a way of life that is an intriguing part of America's heritage. Kingsport
Ryman Auditorium  The Ryman Auditorium first opened its doors in 1892 as a vision of Captain Thomas G. Ryman.  With the coming of the Grand Ole Opry show in 1943, the Ryman found its identity as the Mother Church of Country Music.  In 1974, the Opry moved to its current home by the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center.  In 1994 the Ryman was restored to be the national showplace that it is today. Nashville
Sun Studio's  When 18 year old Elvis walked into Sun Studio, he was asked who he sounded like. He said: "I donít sound like nobody".  And he sang like nobody ever had, with the honesty of the blues and the wildness of an all night party! Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, and Elvis were all friends here. They made a new sound in this Studio. It had the beat, the soul and especially the attitude that came to be called "Rock NíRoll" Memphis
Traverllers' Rest Plantation  The Life of Judge John Overton - A look at the early 19th century world of John Overton and the home he built.  During the Battle of Nashville Travellers' Rest served as headquarters for Confederate general John Bell Hood. Experience life in occupied Nashville and the infamous battle of 1864. Nashville
Walnut Street Bridge  Erected in 1890, the Walnut Street Bridge was the first to connect Chattanooga's downtown with the North Shore. In 1978, the State of Tennessee closed the old Walnut Street Bridge because it was no longer deemed safe for passage.  Citizens rose to save the bridge and structural modifications have been made to turn the bridge into what is now a pedestrian walkway. The 1/2-mile span is the longest pedestrian bridge in the world and very popular among local residents. Chattanooga
The Woodruff-Fontaine House  The Woodruff-Fontaine House, located at 680 Adams Avenue in Memphis, TN is one of the most luxurious historical mansions in Memphis. It was built in 1870 by Amos Woodruff. He and his family lived there until 1883, when the mansion was sold to Noland Fontaine, who was a prominent Memphis cotton factor. Memphis
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